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October 24, 2017

Y4Y is pleased to offer a series of webinars designed specifically for 21st CCLC state coordinators/directors by the U.S. Department of Education. These recorded events are available for viewing at your convenience right here. This blog presents highlights from “New State Directors,” and you can download a copy of the blog to keep it handy for quick reference. For other resources that support your work, click on State Coordinators on the Y4Y home page.

New State Directors Webinar

Every new job comes with a learning curve. Perhaps, on day one as coordinator/director of your state’s 21st CCLC program, that curve felt steeper than expected. Fortunately, resources are available, and this webinar offers information about where to find them. It draws on the experiences of two state coordinators: Sonia Johnson of Oklahoma and Haydee Perez-Livingston of New Jersey. Here’s an overview of their advice. 

Advice

- Give yourself time. Learn, listen, assess program status and figure out how things work. 

- Don’t be afraid to make decisions. Use federal and state guidance to make educated decisions; you can always make adjustments next year.

- Act in the best interest of the program, keeping students and community in mind.

- Have a growth mind-set. Consider the successes and challenges you hear from other states, and use them to revisit policies. Recognize that this field is growing and changing, and you need to look at the big picture. 

Sonia Johnson noted that partner connections help her model what it looks like to connect to the school day and to incorporate other elements of high-quality programs. As she put it, “These connections to other organizations help me see how it all fits together in supporting the whole child and improving education.” 

Find Written Guidance

- Federal laws: The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA)

- Code of Federal Regulations: Title 2: Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards (Uniform Guidance); Title 34, Parts 74-99: Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR)

- U.S. Department of Education Non-Regulatory Guidance for 21st CCLC Grants

- State guidance: State laws, agency policies, state education plan, grant guidance, 21st CCLC request for proposal/application form

Links to all federal documents are available on this 21st CCLC program page.

Build Relationships

- State department of education: The previous 21st CCLC state coordinator/director, the coordinators/directors of federal Title offices, and your 21st CCLC state-level evaluator. 

- Budget office and grants management office (if your state has one): Get help with finance and grant review/administration.

- State agencies with overlapping missions: The departments of labor and health and human services, among others, may have policies and programs that connect to 21st CCLC activities.

- Your 21st CCLC grantees: Connect through regional meetings, conference calls and the listserv. Let them know about state-level information and resources. Also, get to the actual program sites to build relationships and find out what works and what doesn’t in the various communities.

- Your 21st CCLC peers: Other state coordinators/directors willingly share knowledge by phone, email or listserv. Depending on your need, reach out to states that have geographic or grant size similarities. The ed.gov website provides contact lists and other information about state grants.

- Federal venues: The Department’s 21st CCLC program officers and the 21st CCLC Summer Institute are great resources for professional learning and networking. 

- Partners: Remember that “community” is in the program name. Connect with community partners, institutions of higher education, and state and national organizations to help build capacity and to cultivate potential grantees. Focus on groups that relate to issues important in your state, such as health, early childhood or other areas.
 

 


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