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May 16, 2013

Some of your front line staff may be continuing as summer staff, and others may be brand new. With a mixed group of team members and a transition from one kind of program to another, there’s always a need for additional preparation and training. For one thing, the whole lineup should be committed to aligning programming with school-year standards from the very start. This alignment perspective begins with the program leader, who sets the tone and provides guidance and resources.

Y4Y has plenty of resources to help with your alignment efforts and your alignment trainings. A good way to start thinking about summer program training is to take a look at these possible needs for building staff skills in alignment. Which of these are priorities in your program? How will you incorporate them into your summer-prep training?  



May 3, 2013

In the summer it is even more important than during the school year to “complement, not replicate” school-day learning. What does that look like? Take a look at the Complementing vs. Replicating tool for some ideas to spark your creativity as you plan for summer. Then think about how those strategies for engaging youth interest can be beneficial to your program, to the youth you serve, and to your community.

While you’re thinking about how to most effectively “complement, not replicate,” try one of the challenges on Y4Y. What would you say to encourage a staff member to try a dynamic, motivating activity instead of a worksheet? How could the math, literacy, science, and history concepts typed out on a worksheet be transformed into fun summer activities?



May 3, 2013

Getting staff on board with squeezing academics into summertime can be a challenge. Adults want to have fun in summer, too, not just the kids! Luckily, you can train and prepare staff to run a summer program that is educational and fun at the same time. The Teach portion of Y4Y has resources ready for you to use in your professional development sessions.

The Objectives That Work Training Starter is one example of a resource you can use. Start an open discussion with your team about how to focus summer activities and projects on learning objectives, and see what kinds of great ideas everyone comes up with. The template provides a backbone for the training session but also allows you to customize it and make it fit your program’s needs.



May 3, 2013

Summer programming is open to many opportunities that we may not have time to explore in afterschool time during the school year. Take advantage of summer’s flexibility and extended hours to expose youth to new experiences. Internships, field trips, gardening, long-term projects, and more can help bring learning to life in the summer.

These kinds of experiences are also perfect for helping youth build skills that prepare them to be successful in school and in life. Work with staff to deliberately plan how they can target these skills, such as organization, communication, and collaboration, during the summer.

Check out this Coaching Moment for some fundamental ideas.